9.8.13

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Taken From the 7 Biggest mistakes a CrossFitter makes….
by Box magazine

Highlighting a point brought up following the gymnastics skills sessions Wednesday this week. But brought up again in conversations by coaches over the last couple of days.

It’s important to differentiate between training and competition,” Gelbrich says. “There’s a time and a place for competition, and it’s very useful, but treating every workout session like a competition is a good way to lead to overtraining, injuries and poor technique.”

Fix it: Slow down a little. Sure, this might hurt some of your workout times, but it’s the only way to improve movements in terms of flexibility, skill level and mastering proper form, especially in areas of weakness.

Another viewpoint to think over…

BAD FORM
by Mark Rippetoe

Bad form is bad in every way. Citing specific examples from lifts, Mark Rippetoe co-author of Starting Strength and owner of Wichita Falls Athletic Club/CrossFit Wichita Falls, writes that what constitutes bad form is not a matter of opinion.
Bad form occurs when a movement pattern is executed inefficiently. The bar is moved by incorrect biomechanics. Instead of all the muscles in the system making their anatomically efficient contribution to the loaded movement, some muscles do more than they are supposed to and some do less.

Good form (or technique, or kinematics, or whatever you’d like to call it) should depend on the logic of a dispassionate analysis of the body-and- barbell system in the motion required by the exercise. The exercise is chosen to work a particular movement pattern normal to the human skeleton. The bar has a certain path it most efficiently travels through space for the exercise. The skeleton must move in ways defined by its segment lengths and articulation points to enable this bar path, and the muscles must move the skeleton exactly this way. Anything that deviates from this is bad form.

It’s never an advantage to move a load inefficiently. It is usually just learned wrong through a lack of feedback at a crucial time in the learning process. Or sometimes it’s form creep, bad technique acquired so gradually that it is never perceived as wrong until someone else does you the favor of pointing it out.

Good form is not arbitrary, and its purpose is not aesthetics. It is based on a logical analysis of the relevant mechanics, what works and what doesn’t.

Continue Reading, courtesty of CrossFit Inc.

THERE IS NO POINT GOING TOO HEAVY OR COMPLEX IN A WOD.

This will cause bad form and is detrimental to performance and development.

Any time spent developing more efficient technique will effectively be unlearned and all bad habits reinforced and strengthened further.

If a coach suggests you go lighter or less complex in a movement, do it. It is for you and your development.

DO NOT LET EGO HAMPER PROGRESS

Continuing to do something badly consistently will not magically become a better movement.

EFFICIENCY. CONSISTENCY then INTENSITY

In that order no question

LIFT
3 x 5 Thruster

WOD
1:1
7 Rounds For Time
5 Power clean
10 Burpee
100m Run

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